Understanding Belt & Road Initiative from Indian Perspective

Recently China has organized a summit called Belt and Road Initiative(BRI), in which high level participants from more than 120 countries arrived, including nearly 30 head of the states. India was a conspicuous absentee, even though China, on multiple occasions, requested India to be a participant of this initiative. Since we are witnessing a potential watershed …

Are You VIP

Are you a VIP person? May be or may be not. But in India this word is no more. Last month the Indian government made a decision to curb Red/Blue beacon vehicle that has enhanced the feeling of inequality among the society. Someone who is considered as VIP or VVIP , seemed to be a …

Why naming cities after airport is a bad idea? (Pun)

The scourge of renaming streets, alleys, and cities is not unprecedented, neither is the idea of renaming an airport. Recently, the Uttar Pradesh government in India renamed the Gorakhpur Airforce Station to Mahayogi Goraknath Airport after the founder of the Nath monastic movement; and likewise, the Agra Airport to RSS ideologue Pandit Deen Dayal Upadhyay airport. This is a common process followed by governments in India, and the BJP government seems to be following the footsteps of its predecessors.
However, what is unprecedented is renaming an entire city after an airport. Imagine, to rename the airport of a city, you could just rename the city? Would that be possible?

Looking at the dire state of a country, nothing can be guaranteed. After all, there is no absolute protection against such extreme reclassification.

Imagine the city of Lucknow being renamed as Chaudhari Charan Singh city of U.P.; Singapore being renamed to Changhi city; Eastern Cape in South Africa renamed after East London; New Delhi being renamed to Indira Gandhi; city of Patna after Jaiprakash Narayan; Raipur city to Swami Vivekananda; and Rome being renamed after Leonardo da Vinci. Oh, the irony!

Although there is an earthy honesty in naming places that rings of history, but it resultantly agitates natives and confuses visitors. The former becoming fractious about the selection of the local hero and the latter being forced to mug up the local political history to know if they are flying into the right city.

Perhaps, the principle can be extended to city streets and neighborhoods, to end the menace of political renaming. But this principle cannot degenerate into an assault on history which has been a progress in countries like India, where illustrious names from suddenly suspect dynasties are wiped out in favour of wholesome nomenclature.

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Boringbug

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The scourge of renaming streets, avenues, alleys, and cities is not unprecedented, neither is the idea of renaming an airport. However, what is unprecedented is renaming an entire city after an airport. To rename the airport of a city, you could just rename the city?

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What India really needs: cow protection or protection of human rights?

Upholding of the above fundamental rights and civil rights of the citizens comes as a prima facie responsibility of the legislature, the executive, and the judiciary. Ironically, instead of upholding the rights of the women and minorities (those in dire need) we have drifted to a different path.

Boringbug

I have been stunned by the alarming development in India’s political fiasco i.e. the rising vigilantism under the shed of cow protection inter alia the rise of gau rakshaks (“cow protectors”). But do we really need cow protectors? If yes, then what should cow protectors be protecting? If their pseudo-moral responsibility is limited to the protection of cows then how did this vigilantism resulted in the death of a human?

I’ll limit my thoughts from the perspective of Indian constitution and a rational human. The constitution of India in its Part IV provides with the directive principles of state policy (“DPSP”), wherein article 48, as reprised below states:

Article48. … The state shall endeavour to organise agricultural and animal husbandry on modern and scientific lines and shall, in particular, take steps for preserving and improving the breeds, and prohibiting the slaughter, of cows and calves…

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Aadhaar is Niradhaar: Biometrics is Cheap and Easy to Defeat

Aadhaar is insecure because it is based on biometrics. Biometrics is surveillance technology, a necessity for any State. However, surveillance is much like salt in cooking: essential in tiny quantities, but counterproductive even if slightly in excess. Biometrics should be used for targeted surveillance, but this technology should not be used in e-governance for the …

Roads to the Past

Indian cities tend to look back on their past more selectively. Beyond the major monuments there is little effort to remember the past; the more common memories of recent history are frequently erased. A part of this erasure can be attributed to economic pressures. The cost of maintaining old buildings can be quite high. And …